Graduate course descriptions

FREN GR4025
Practicum in French Language Pedagogy
Dr. P. Hubert-Leibler
For first-time Teaching Fellows (second-year graduate students). The goal of the course is to provide novice instructors with practical support throughout their first semester of teaching, help them learn about and apply best practices, and give them a theoretical foundation in second-language pedagogy. 

FREN GU4xxx
The 68-Effect in French Theory
Prof. E. Balibar
A study of the relationship between the May 68 events in Paris and "French theory," with a focus on 1) “Power and Knowledge” (Foucault and Lacan); 2) “Desire” (Deleuze-Guattari and Irigaray); 3) “Reproduction” (Althusser and Bourdieu-Passeron).

FREN GR8618
African Literature and Philosophy
Prof. S.B. Diagne
The seminar will examine the poetry and the philosophical writings of Negritude authors Léopold Sédar Senghor (1906-2001) from Senegal, Aimé Césaire (1913- 2008) from Martinique and Léon Gontran Damas (1912-1978) from Guyana in connection with the works of Marx, Nietzsche, Bergson, Levy-Bruhl, Sartre, and Teilhard de Chardin. Discussions on philosophical questions of identity and difference, or of an African aesthetics, or of universalism will be combined with close readings of the poetry and theater of the three authors.

CLHS GR8916
French Empires
Prof. E. Saada
As in many other European countries in the last twenty years, the historiography of France has been reshaped by interest in the imperial trajectory of the nation. This class will explore this 'imperial turn', and examine its specificity vis-à-vis the historiographies of other European empires. We will examine the questions that have been at the center of the historian's agenda: what kind of historical processes are revealed (or masked) by the imperial perspective? How do we think historically about the relationships between nation, republic and empire?  How has the 'imperial turn' shaped the categories and writing practices of historians? What are the contributions of historians to the understanding of post-colonialism?

FREN GR8420
Rousseau and his Critics
Prof. J. Stalnaker
In this course we will read Rousseau through the lens of the extremely polarized critical reactions his writings have elicited, from Diderot to Derrida and beyond. We will try to understand why this figure has been viewed as an exemplar of both the Enlightenment and the Counter-Enlightenment, as a defender of human liberty and as a proto-fascist, as an inspiration to women writers and as a misogynist. We will also address the ways Rousseau defined himself and his work, often in opposition to his fellow philosophes and critics. The course will be held in French, but papers may be written in English for students outside the French department.

FREN GR8091
Proseminar: Introduction to Literary Research
Prof. P. Force
Designed for first-year graduate students. An introduction to the conceptual and practical tools of literary research.

CLFR GR8xxx
Structures of Feeling: Emotions in History and Literature
Prof. T. Dodman
This seminar initiates graduate students in the humanities and social sciences to the historical study of emotions broadly defined. It provides an interdisciplinary genealogy of a field recently propelled into the spotlight by the so-called “biological turn,” and pushes to reflect upon the opportunities and pitfalls of studying emotions. Topics covered include: anthropological and psychological understandings of emotion; affect theory and its critique; what insights neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and evolutionary biology can bring to the humanities; and, conversely, what a historically grounded approach to emotion can provide to a critical understanding of society and culture.

HIST UG4110
French America, 1534-1804
Prof. P. Force
A study of the French Atlantic World from the exploration of Canada to the Louisiana Purchase and Haitian Independence, with a focus on the relationship between war and trade, forms of intercultural negotiation, the economics of slavery, and the changing meaning of race. The course is designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

CPLS GR6100
Introduction to Comparative Literature
Prof. S.B. Diagne
The seminar will be devoted to the question of "comparison and reciprocity". The particular figure of comparaison to be examined is that of translation, broadly understood, and the thesis to be discussed is that translation plays the ethical role of creating reciprocity even in asymmetrical spaces such as the colonial space. Examples from art and from literature will be studied.  

FREN GR8xxx
The Maghreb in Transition
Prof. M. Dobie
This course explores contemporary culture in the Maghreb, considering how recent literary works and films are engaging with political, social and economic change. We'll focus on the period from the 1990s, when Morocco underwent a change in leadership and Algeria began a transition to democracy that evolved into violence, to the revolutionary movements of 2011 and their aftermath. Areas that we'll examine will include language politics and literacy, developments in the publishing and film industries, the role of new media and social media, the representation of gender and sexuality and shifts in thematics and aesthetic currents.

FREN GR8417
Pascal, Hermeneutics and Rhetoric
Prof. P. Force
A study of Blaise Pascal’s complete works, including the Pensées, the Lettres provinciales, and the Entretiens sur Epictète et Montaigne, with a focus on issues of persuasion, Biblical interpretation, epistemology, and politics.

CLFR GR8xxx
The 19th Century Novel in France and England
Profs. E. Ladenson, N. Dames
This course will compare French and English approaches to the novel as it emerged as the dominant literary form over the course of the 19th century.  Authors studied will include Dickens, Balzac, Flaubert, Sand, Eliot, Thackeray, Trollope, and Zola.

FREN GR8xxx
Eloquent Animals in Medieval Literature
Prof. E. Zingesser
Medieval literature, like contemporary literature, sometimes features talking animals. But medieval grammatical treatises describe non-human animal utterances as meaningless and (usually) as untranscribable in writing. Some human utterances also fall into this category—a fact that grammatical treatises acknowledge—, rendering language alone an inadequate means of shoring up the species boundary. When authors liken their own language to that of a non-human animal, such as the myriad medieval poets who profess to "sing like the birds," is this a serious claim, leading to experimental poetics? When non-human animals "speak" in medieval fiction, do they speak differently from their human counterparts? This seminar surveys texts in which animals communicate—via language or via other symbolic systems. How, if at all, did medieval authors attempt to draw the line between human and non-human animals? Our reading will include lyric poetry by the troubadours and trouvères, Chrétien de Troyes' Yvain, Philomena, selected lais by Marie de France, the Novas del papagai (The Story of the Parrot), the Roman de Renart, and Gaston Phébus's Le livre de chasse. Alongside these texts, we will read theoretical reflections on language and sound, both medieval and modern, including medieval catalogs of animal "noises" and grammatical treatises on voice. Contemporary reflections by Derrida, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Mladen Dolar and others.