Graduate course descriptions

THE QUESTION OF THE OTHER/other IN CONTEMPORARY FRENCH PHILOSOPHY
Etienne Balibar
This seminar will focus on an anthology of major philosophical texts from the second half of the 20th century that address the issue of the Other (l’autre/Autrui) as an ontological and anthropological problem. They range from Sartre and Lacan to Levinas and Derrida through de Beauvoir, Levi-Strauss, Foucault, Irigaray and Fanon. Together, they construct a theoretical conversation which arguably redefined the dilemmas of identity and difference tracing back to the very beginnings of Western philosophy.

RABELAIS & MONTAIGNE
Antoine Compagnon
Close reading of Rabelais and Montaigne in the context of the Renaissance, the rise of the individual, religious quarrels, the civil wars, the discovery of the New World and the progress of science.

QUESTIONS IN AFRICAN LITERATURE
Souleymane Bachir Diagne
The seminar will examine the writing of violence, resistance and hope in two films by Ousmane Sembène, Moolaadé and Guelwar, and four novels dealing with the genocide in Rwanda: Boubacar Boris Diop’s Murambi, le livre des ossements, Veronique Tadjo’s L’ombre d’Imana, voyage jusqu’au bout du Rwanda; Abdourahman Waberi’s Moisson de crânes, and Tierno Monenembo’s L’aîné des orphelins.

PROSEMINAR: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY RESEARCH
Madeleine Dobie
This course is designed for first-year graduate students in French. We study and practice techniques of close reading and think about its place in literary and cultural theory and explore different genres of academic writing. We also develop some of the practical tools of research in our fields (bibliography, databases, and libraries).

THE DIGITAL CARIBBEAN
Kaiama Glover & Alex Gil
The Internet is analogous in important ways to the Caribbean itself as dynamic and fluid cultural space: it is generated from disparate places and by disparate peoples; it challenges fundamentally the geographical and physical barriers that disrupt or disallow connection; and it places others in relentless relation. This class will both introduce students to the digital humanities and to the French-speaking Caribbean as a generative geo-cultural space for exploring the potential of the Internet to confront and disrupt many of the structures of dominance that have traditionally silenced marginalized voices. It will provide an introduction to several of the formats and tools that have facilitated such engagements, along with immediate critical reflection and discussion about their value to the academy. Since information technology has become one of the key ways in which the peoples of the French-speaking Caribbean and its diasporas both communicate with one another and gain access to global conversations, alongside this exploration of digital tools, in general, this class will consider how the Internet enables people in marginalized spaces to engage with crucial social problems and to express their intellectual and political perspectives.

FRENCH DEPARTMENT LECTURE SERIES
Curated by Aubrey Gabel & Students
The class organizes two lectures on current work in the field of French & Francophone Studies. Students participate in selecting and introducing speakers and leading the discussion.

REMAPPING ALGERIA: POETICS AND POLITICS OF SPACE
Madeleine Dobie
Offered in conjunction with the Center for Spatial research, this seminar explores representations of space in contemporary Algerian literature and film, considering how spatial imaginaries engage with changing social and political landscapes. The arts in Algeria have often been approached from the perspective of their narration of national history, notably the country’s emblematic War of Independence against France (1954-62). We consider how they attend, in addition, to contemporary social and political dynamics distilled in the experience of space, e.g. urban overcrowding, intra and inter-national migration, environmental damage and real estate development and speculation. We also look ‘outside’ the text/image at the sites and physical locations of cultural production such as publishing houses and book fairs, film festivals and cine-clubs, arts associations and literary cafes. The course methodology is cross-disciplinary, combining a primary focus on the arts with readings in sociology, critical geography and urban and architectural history. We draw on seminal theoretical approaches to the experience and representation of space, including the influential French tradition represented by Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau and Guy Debord, for whom colonial Algeria furnished crucial points of reference. The course also has a cartographic component. Students explore how, since the colonial era, Algeria has been mapped and remapped, considering the political and economic investments that have underpinned these cartographic practices. Through a 1.5 credit Center for Spatial Research workshop, Questions in Spatial Research, they receive technical instruction in digital cartographic methods and develop skills to undertake digital projects that reflect their own questions and modes of enquiry.

DISSERTATION WORKSHOP
Pierre Force
Open to all students who have begun to work on their dissertations the workshop provides a setting for discussion and critical reading of dissertation prospectuses, outlines, and chapters, as well as fellowship and grant proposals.

FRENCH MORALISTS OF THE 17TH CENTURY
Pierre Force
A study of seventeenth-century prose writers who cultivated brevity and paradox in their accounts of the human condition, with a focus on Pascal’s Pensées, La Rochefoucauld’s Maximes, and La Bruyère’s Caractères.

RACE AND SEXUALITY IN MODERN FRANCE AND ITS EMPIRES
Camille Robcis & Emmanuelle Saada
This graduate seminar explores the intersections of race and sexuality in France and its empires from the 18th century to the present. Through close readings of primary sources, historical, and theoretical works, we will examine how the politics of desire, the management of affective regimes, and the production of sexual norms and exceptions intersected with the making and unmaking of racial orders.

FICTIONS OF ENLIGHTENMENT
Caroline Weber
This course examines the development of the “philosophical” novel and related fictional forms in France in the century preceding the Revolution. Authors considered include La Fayette, Montesquieu, Graffigny, Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, Leprince de Beaumont; Choderlos de Laclos, and Sade; secondary readings will be assigned from Horkheimer and Adorno; Foucault; Lacan; Spivak; Bhabha; and Kofman. Designed with an overarching focus on the ideals of Enlightenment, the course will address such themes as: social and governmental reform; political and intellectual freedom; cultural and religious tolerance; gender and sexual difference; and the primacy and pitfalls of human reason.

MA PRACTICUM
Eliza Zingesser
This course is designed for students in their second semester. We continue the work of the Proseminar on exploring the profession (professional organizations and societies; journals) and techniques of scholarship such as digital humanities. Students also begin to plan and write their MA essay, benefitting for opportunities to brainstorm ideas and workshop writing in a collaborative setting.

FRENCH DEPARTMENT LECTURE SERIES
Curated by Aubrey Gabel & Students
The class organizes two lectures on current work in the field of French & Francophone Studies. Students participate in selecting and introducing speakers and leading the discussion.